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Miso - 16 oz. Glass Jar
SKU: 366
Your Price: $11.95
Sale Price: $6.50
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Why You Need It

Only shipped October 22nd through April. Buy in-store rest of the year*

Organic & Aged MISO - 16 oz. jar
Miso – A Natural Probiotic Food

“Miso is prized for its ability to aid in the digestion and assimilation of other foods. At least four digestive agents are contained in all non-pasteurized miso: natural digestive enzymes, lactic-acid producing bacteria (Lactobacillus and Pediococcus species), salt-resistant yeasts and other microorganisms are present in koji. Only the very hardiest microorganisms are able to survive the rigors of several years’ fermentation in the present of salt. Thus they and their enzymes are well suited to continue their work in the large and small intestines where they break down or digest complex proteins, carbohydrates, and fats into simpler, more easily assimilable molecules. In Japan, commercially available digestive enzymes are often made from the same type of koji used to make miso.

“A well known Japanese proverb states that a bowl of miso soup each day keeps the doctor away, and traditional folk wisdom abounds with sayings about the value of miso as a medicine used to cure colds, improve metabolism, clear the skin, and help develop resistance to parasitic disease.  Miso is often used quite specifically …  to settle an upset stomach, ameliorate a hangover, or get rid of acid indigestion.”

From The Book of Miso, by William Shurtleff and Akiko Aoyagi, (Ten Speed Press 1983, page 21 and page 25)

These misos are rich-tasting, hearty, slightly chunky and a perfect addition to many meals. Add depth, flavor and nutrition with one of our varieties.

Basic Miso Soup

2 tsp oil

1 cup onions, thinly sliced

1 cup carrots

2 cups finely chopped cabbage or other greens

1 quart water

3-5 Tbs.  miso,  depending on  variety

Heat oil in heavy pot.  Add onions, carrots and sauté 2-3 min. Add water, cover bring to boil, simmer for 10 min. Add cabbage and simmer 2-3 mins. Cream miso with a little of the broth, add to soup, and turn off heat. Serve garnished with minced parsley. Serves 4

 

Egg-drop Miso Soup

1 fresh  organic egg

1 quart of soup stock or water

¼ miso

1 minced scallion

Optional: I sheet of nori (sea vegetable), toasted und cut into small pieces

Beat egg. Bring stock to boil; pour egg into boiling stock in a thin thread, stirring quickly while you pour. (If you do not stir, the egg will clump up.)  The thin thread of the egg-drop cooks very quickly, rising to the surface of the soup like tiny beautiful flowers. Boil a minute or two, then turn down flame. Place miso in a bowl, add broth, and puree. Blend puree with soup and simmer a few minutes. Garnish each bowl with nori and scallion. Serves 4

 

Miso Mighty (Better’n Coffee)

Instant  Drink

1 cup of hot water

1-2 tsp. miso, depending on variety

Mixed into a cup of hot water, miso makes a simple and fortifying drink, a good substitute for coffee. Use Dandelion Leek or Garlic Red Pepper for an especially satisfying instant broth.

From The little Book of Miso: Recipes from South River

* shipping availability dates subject to change depending on weather temperatures as our miso is a live, fermented product and cannot be shipped in extreme heat.

More Info

How long does miso keep? I have had a jar of miso in my refrigerator for about a year. Is it still ok?

Opened or unopened, refrigerated or not, miso will keep indefinitely. Since South River Miso is a living food, it will continue to age in the jar. Over the course of time, it will darken and become more savory; it is still good to eat.

I have heard it is best not to cook miso; if so, how do I make miso soup?

Each teaspoon of unpasteurized miso contains millions of active micro organisms which are beneficial to the dynamic digestion and assimilation of all foods, and which help to establish and maintain a healthy, vigorous digestive system. For these reasons, miso should not be subjected to prolonged cooking or high heat. Add miso at the end of cooking and turn the heat source down very low or remove soup from stove and serve several minutes later, allowing the flavors to blend.

How much miso should I use?

For the greatest benefit miso should be used in small amounts on a regular basis. One to two tablespoons per day would be average use. When seasoning soup, begin by adding a small amount of miso, one to two teaspoons per cup of liquid, adding more if needed. Miso soup should taste neither too salty nor too bland. The miso should mingle with the flavor of the soup and enhance, but not overpower it.

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Southern Botanicals Herbals & Nutrition
611 S Myrtle Ave # D, Clearwater, FL 33756
(727) 443-7711


* Disclaimer: Statements made, or products sold through this web site, have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. They are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Read More...
** Excluded from Free Shipping: Miracle II soaps other Miracle II products; Silver Water products; Castor Oil; Tonic Supreme; Plant-derived Minerals (liquid); Black Seed oil 8 oz (liquid); Diatomaceous Earth; Organic Sulfur, Celtic Sea salt 1-lb and larger sizes; Maple syrup, Honey or Molasses; Chia seeds; All nut & seed butters, Coconut oil, Olive oil; Tulip Spice Grinder; Ear Candles; Tampico Skin Brush; Master Cleanse Kits, all books larger than pamphlet size, fermentation supplies which contain glass weights (Pickle Pebbles).Free Shipping in the Continental United States only.